Thursday, June 13, 2013

Romanticizing psychos: Heathcliff and Christian Grey

Ok, so this post is going to be short because:
1. I haven't done a through research on the topic
2. I don't want to ramble on, because I know, you won't read it, you spoiled skimming (imaginary) bastards

Here's the thing (again #1), I've come to notice here and there that say some people tend to misunderstand the character of Heathcliff, so let me clarify  for you: Heathcliff is a fucking sociopath. He scored 25 on this test.

Christian Grey would score somewhere around 27 (I am too lazy to do it again), only I'd call him a psychopath, not a sociopath. 

Now, because I don't know if this site makes the difference between the two terms, I will do it for you. The most simple explanation is: The psychopath is someone, who simply doesn't know or understand the difference between wrong and right (or good and evil, if you will). The sociopath does, but doesn't care.

I will not go into detail why I consider one a psychopath and the other a sociopath, the point is: they are both mentally ill and only have one (possibly) redeeming quality: the love for the heroine (Catherine/Ana).

But here's the difference (and the problem), while Heathcliff was meant to be like that; he was meant to be a thoroughly unlikable anti-hero, Christian's abusive, psycho tendencies are romanticized..

No, fuck this shit!  

Why? Women, why do you want a guys like that? Stop! Now! Just... no.


*Now, this doesn't mean he's a mass murderer, it just means he has an actual mental disorder.


11 comments:

  1. I'm sick of women pining and sighing over Heathcliff. I felt awful for the little boy, but he grew up to be a terrible man. I suspect that most women who think heathcliff is so romantic have not actually read the book, they just listened to that Kate Bush song.

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  2. Thank you, dear sane person.
    i didn't know that women were pining over Heathcliff. I always thought that character was creepy, but at the same time well developed, unlike the carbon copy of Christian, who in his own right is a carbon copy of Edward, who is a carbon copy of a carbon copy...oh, well.

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  3. Christian arguably scores above 30. I'm actually pretty scared about how many women pine for Christian. If he's just a fantasy character (why on earth is he even that?), then why are women truly wanting someone like him? Why are women defending his actions? Why are more MEN who've read the books offended by how awful Christian is? The percentage of men asking why women are loving Christian compared to the percentage of women asking the same is telling. When most men are saying that Christian is a bad guy, I think more women need to listen.

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  4. It is sad that these two are romanticized. I always hated characters like this, Heathcliff was written to be unlikable while Christian is meant to be a romantic hero but sadly falls really, really short. I'm in the middle of writing a strong heroine who falls for a strong male character but not until the end of the story because the story isn't about the romance. I always liked independent women in books and shows. It might have something to do with the way I was raised, to admire strong and independent women.

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  5. I really like Heathcliff as a character because he's so utterly unlikeable and terrible but he's a fully realized character. Characters like him are fascinating, the same way Norman Bates in Psycho is. Romanticizing them however really creeps me out.

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  6. There is actually a disorder linked to the need to romanticize the unattainable affections of a psychopath/sociopath and other like disorders. They are fascinating and hit all the "no body understands them but me" buttons and are expert manipulators who will encourage such mentalities for their own use/amusement.

    Personally, I can't stand Christian Grey as he's uninteresting and is a shitty written character and I have no idea whom Heathcliff is...aside from a cartoon cat. But there are other characters that have caught my eye because when they are in fiction they are "safe". They can't hurt you so you can observe and have access to information about them that you would be in real life. In short they are fun to analyze and fiction lets you do that without putting yourself at direct risk.

    Also- LOVE your simplified definition of a psychopath and sociopath. The two overlap and are often used to mean the same thing. I wouldn't define Christian as one (though I have no dough that he would wish to be labeled as such) because he has other stuff going in his head. Personality disorders a plenty- he's defiantly in the spectrum but I would not "flatter" him with a label of a fictional psychopath or sociopath.

    But then I am most likely saying this because I fucking hate the guy and the author who wrote him. Maybe if the author wrote him better and actually cashed in on some of the indicators and points she had no idea she was writing and actually knew how to plot, we probably would have had a psychopath character worth analyzing.

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  7. I am excited for the Fifty Shades of Grey movie. and i watch Christian Grey's work it is pretty awesome to see on the screen Christian Grey

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  8. I loved the book Fifty Shades Of Grey. I am so glad i enjoyed Christian and Ana's story. I like Christian Grey

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  9. I totally agree with your assessment of both. The only thing I could add is that I'm not sure if you could really call it love, because in both cases it seemed more like a bid for control. Heathcliff struggled to control Catherine, despite her obligation to class etiquette, which was the way life was back then. He was singularly obsessed with her, and pushed her to her death for rejecting him. Same with Christian Grey, definitely a psychopath, very smart and calculated, very manipulative to the inexperienced Ana. Another bid for control in that case as well. I agree that it is dangerous to romaticise these men, because I can tell you that men like Christian don't change from the love of a woman. That's absolute rubbish to even think that they would or could. Too many women stay in abusive relationships because they believe that he'll change, or stop if she just loves him enough. Life isn't that pretty and it never works out that way. And for a popular book series to even suggest this is possible seems really irresponsible to me.

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  10. I totally agree with your assessment of both. The only thing I could add is that I'm not sure if you could really call it love, because in both cases it seemed more like a bid for control. Heathcliff struggled to control Catherine, despite her obligation to class etiquette, which was the way life was back then. He was singularly obsessed with her, and pushed her to her death for rejecting him. Same with Christian Grey, definitely a psychopath, very smart and calculated, very manipulative to the inexperienced Ana. Another bid for control in that case as well. I agree that it is dangerous to romaticise these men, because I can tell you that men like Christian don't change from the love of a woman. That's absolute rubbish to even think that they would or could. Too many women stay in abusive relationships because they believe that he'll change, or stop if she just loves him enough. Life isn't that pretty and it never works out that way. And for a popular book series to even suggest this is possible seems really irresponsible to me.

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